Thursday, March 26, 2009

Caribbean beach 2

Yesterday I showed a view up the Caribbean beach shoreline. One reader, Brattcatt, who frequently notices and leaves insightful comments about the details in my photos, left a comment yesterday asking about the debris that she could see on the beach. I therefore decided to post this picture. The beach debris consists of logs, branches sticks, palm fronds, and whatever else washes up from the ocean.

Tortuguero is an area of dense vegetation. Therefore there is a lot of vegetation that drops off trees, or trees that fall into the water and are carried out to sea and then wash up on the shore.

There is not much litter on the beach because very few people live in the northeastern corner of Costa Rica. Much of the coastline is protected as a national park. The area can be reached only by boat or small plane. There are no roads leading into or out of Tortuguero because it would be simply too expensive and impractical to build bridges over the honeycomb maze of rivers and canals.

Although there are few people to generate trash, there are also few people to pick up trash. Whatever might be floating in the ocean and washes up on shore will tend to stay there.

This raises the subject of litter, so I will address that now. Although Costa Rica has an amazing environmental ethic and has set aside more of its land for national parks and nature preserves than any other country -- 25% -- it does have a problem with roadside trash. The popular culture of preserving land for wildlife has not extended enough into keeping towns, villages, and roadsides clear of litter. There are efforts to improve that, however, and some communities, including Tamarindo, have had community clean-up and recycling days to remove litter.

In Tamarindo and Playa Langosta where we have our condos on the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica, our beaches are clean and we do not have aproblem with litter or debris washing up on the beach. In fact, Playa Langosta has maintained the coveted Blue Flag certification for passing the highest international standards for cleanliness of the beach and water.

7 comments:

brattcat said...

An excellent post, and thank you for your kind shout-out. If I leave interesting comments, it's only because your photography and comments inspire thoughtful attention.

Sharon said...

This looks like the remains after a storm. It's interesting how different two sides of Costa Rica are. The beach on the Tamarindo side is always pristine.

Jarart said...

I'm always intrigued by the things that wash up on a beach.

Lilli & Nevada said...

Gosh i love your coast, would love to be there

AntiguaDailyPhoto.Com said...

Dave, care to start a pseudo fight with sister city La Antigua Guatemala Daily Photo. I left enough things in the entry about caimitos to start the pseudo fight. I hope you stop by and set me straight! ;-)

http://antiguadailyphoto.com/2009/03/25/guatemalan-fruit-caimito/

Dave-CostaRicaDailyPhoto.com said...

AntiguaDailyPhoto.com--
Thank you for your comment, and as I said in the comment that I left on your site, I would enjoy some good natured exchanges about our respective countries. You have an excellent site and my wife and I have admired your wonderful photos many times.

JM said...

I've been watching your Tortuguero posts for a while and let me tell you I feel a bit nostalgic now! What a wonderful place that is! The howler monkey shot is amazing! I was never able to get such a close-up. And the beach with all that drifwood is just the way I saw it! Thank you for making me feel like I was there again! :-)

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