Monday, April 21, 2014

Jaguar Metates

Here are some more of the stone jaguar metates in the Pre-Columbian Gold Museum in San Jose.

These metates were not used for grinding corn, as they do not show signs of being used.  Instead, they were funerary offerings buried with nobility between 500 B.C. and 500 A.D.  They come from northwest Costa Rica, which is the province where Tamarindo is located.

The skillfulness of the artisans who carved these is indeed impressive.  It is also interesting how ancient cultures incorporate animal designs into the most precious of objects, as metates buried with nobility must have been.

We have photos from a cruise up the east coast of Baja California in Mexico's Sea of Cortez posted this week on our Viva la Voyage travel photo site.

6 comments:

PerthDailyPhoto said...

How fascinating to see these really ancient pieces Dave, totally incredible to think they've been around so long.
P.s. It was fun to see yourself, Julie and Sharon with Bob when he was there.

Sharon Anck said...

I think the ancient cultures must have had a profound respect for the animal world.

Judy said...

Those are such beautiful pieces of art.

glenda said...

These are graceful and fierce at the same time.

Jack said...

And what is most impressive, Dave, is that the one in front can read!

Bob Crowe said...

This from Guanacaste. How very different from what you see today in Guiatil.

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